Seguridad marítima

Ship ahoy: China, US locked in naval warship race

Asia Times

China’s Type 055 cruisers and America’s Zumwalt destroyers showcase both countries’ rising naval might

By GABRIEL HONRADAJANUARY 15, 2022

 

In a move reminiscent of the Anglo-German naval arms race before World War I, China and the US are upping the ante by seeking to outbuild each other in large surface warships.

 

China has just announced that its second Type 055 cruiser Lhasa is combat-ready after a series of tests in the Yellow Sea. The Lhasa recently finished eight days of training simulations, including naval gunnery, missile firing, antisubmarine warfare, defense against chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) threats, visit, board, search, and seizure (VBSS), personnel rescue and damage control.

Moreover, China is reportedly building two more Type 055 cruisers, which are being assembled

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Fisherman Admits to Leaving Wheelhouse Before Collision With Bulker

 

 

 

 

The Leila Jo after the collision, with damage to her bow (Courtesy NZ TAIC)

PUBLISHED DEC 22, 2021 8:15 PM BY THE MARITIME EXECUTIVE

 

 

A crewmember who was standing watch aboard the fishing vessel Leila Jo when it collided with a bulker off Lyttelton, New Zealand in early 2020 has pleaded guilty to charges that he left the wheelhouse unattended. 

On the night of January 12, 2020, the bulker Rose Harmony was outbound from Lyttelton, bound for the nearby port of Dunedin. Leila Jo was inbound, headed for her home port. It was a clear night, and both vessels detected each other well in advance.

Aboard Rose Harmony, the third officer spotted Leila Jo ahead and determined that the vessel posed a risk of collision. The third officer told

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habla la DGMM

https://www.mitma.gob.es/recursos_mfom/paginabasica

/recursos/boletin_dgmm_noviembre.pdf

boletin informativo de la DGMM

https://www.mitma.gob.es/ministerio/

boletin_informativo_marina_mercante

Crew Change and the future of shipping streamlining processes

 

By Ilaria Grasso Macola11 Nov 2021

Singapore-based platform Greywing has developed a new technology called Crew Change to help companies make smarter changes around Covid-19 regulations. We profile the technology and look at how it could become fundamental for the future of shipping streamlining processes.

At the end of March 2020, a few weeks after the world went quiet because of Covid-19 lockdowns and travel bans, Nick Clarke – CEO at Singapore-based, Y Combinator-backed, platform Greywing – was talking to a security officer about how to solve shipping security issues in the Gulf of Guinea, when the customer mentioned they were having issues related to Covid-19 and couldn’t perform crewchanges.

Hrishi (Olickel – Greywing’s co-founder and the company’s CTO) and I had a quick chat

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